The 4 major weeds you don’t want in your hay.

Hay season has finished and lovely yellow rectangles and rolls dot the hills and flats of the Peel Harvey region, but don’t be taken in – hay can hide a multitude of weeds you could be introducing onto your property.  Movement between properties of hay, animals and machinery are some of the most common ways weeds are transported through the environment.  All property owners should have specific property biosecurity plan in place to restrict the movement of weeds and pests.

One persons weed can be another persons treasure, but there are weeds that can be toxic to livestock and owners should be aware of what these look like. There are a few things to restrict the likely hood of introducing weeds onto your property through your hay. They include educating yourself on what weeds can look like when baled up in hay, checking out the verges and adjoining proprieties for weeds of your hay supplier, and asking questions about the baling process and the quality of the hay.

Four major weeds you could find in your hay-

 

Patersons Curse  (Echium plantagineum) 

patersons curse weed

Declared- Yes

Toxic- Yes

Recommended herbicides
In cereals

Chlorsulfuron; Metsulfuron methyl; Triasulfuron; Tigrex; Broadstrike; Jaguar; Bromoxynil + MCPA

In pasture, up to four leaf stage

Jaguar®; Tigrex®; Broadstrike®; Bromoxynil + MCPA

At early flowering, seed set control

Chlorsulfuron; Metsulfuron methyl; Triasulfuron; Glyphosate + 2,4-D LV ester

 

Narrow leaf cotton bush (Gomphocarpus fruticosus) –

Cotton bush

Declared- Yes

Toxic- Yes

Recommended herbicides Glyphosate

Triclopyr            

 

One-leaf cape tulip (Moraea flaccida, previously Homeria flaccida) –

Cape tulip

Declared- No

Toxic- Yes

Recommended herbicides
(One-leaf) August-September, (two-leaf) July-end August:

2,4-D LV ester (cereals and pasture)

2,4-D amine (cereals and pasture)

2,4-DB (cereals and pasture)

Paraquat (blanket wiper)

Full emergence to early August:

2,2-DPA

Wheat pre-sowing or post-emergence. Barley and oats post-emergence only:

Chlorsulfuron

Wheat: 10 days pre-sowing. Barley post-emergence:

Metsulfuron

At point of corm exhaustion (pasture):

Spinnaker® (for two-leaf only)

Barley Grass (Hordeum glaucum and H. leporinum) –

Barley Grass weed

Declared- No

Toxic- No (seed head causes physical injuries to eyes and mouth of livestock)

Recommended herbicides

Post-emergent herbicide control is limited due to a limited range of herbicides available for the control of barley grass in wheat and other cereals.

 

Integrated weed management

Tactic name

Most likely % control (range) Comments on use
Crop choice and sequence 85 (0–95) Avoid planting barley in infested areas
Herbicide-tolerant crops 80 (40–95) Triazines and imidazolinone herbicides provide useful control in tolerant crops
Burning residues 50 (0–75) Dropping chaff and straw into windrows improves control
Inversion ploughing 90 (70–99) Use skimmers to ensure deep burial
Delayed sowing 60 (50–90) Level of control depends on autumn break. Use in combination with Tactic 2.2a

 

These herbicide and control recommendations are from the Department of Food and Agriculture’s website. Follow the link for more information or to look up control notes for different weeds. When using herbicides remember to use the correct safety equipment and always read the Material Safety Data Sheet for the chemical you are using (available by law through any stockist).

 

 

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