A pile of pulled out cotton bush

Post fire weed control successful with industry grants help.

Agricultural landholders and land managers in the local government areas of Waroona, Harvey, Murray, Serpentine-Jarrahdale and Mandurah were invited to apply for grants to support their efforts to control weeds in early 2017.

An applicant from the Cookernup area said that  “spraying went really well and successfully knocked off the larger cotton bush plants. Now that the summer grass has died off it is easy to see the young emergent cotton bush and we are keeping on top of these by walking the area once a week.” The program had great feedback being easy and straight forward in the application process and the rolling out of the grant funding. The property owner reported that the “..fire although devastating did remove the larger Apple of Sodom plants that had been difficult to remove and its a high priority not to let the weed get established again. Of course weed control is always ongoing especially with the recent rainfall”.

Another applicant from the Yarloop area also had a good experience with the grant program. The applicant stated that ” the contractors provided through the program were fantastic, very knowledgeable and experienced. The contractors were able to effectively control cotton bush in a very steep and rocky area of our property. They were so good we even had them back to spray weeds in the wet areas on our property”. These contractors Western Conservation PTY Ltd can be found on Facebook and have a range of environmental management services they offer.

a pile of pulled out cotton bush

 

Grants from $100 to $1500 were available for the purchase of herbicide, spray packs or the hiring of an appropriate weed control contractor for successful applicants. The grants were available for landholdings used primarily for agriculture or horticulture. Below are two applicants of the program sharing their experiences. The grant was a coordinated program combining the Peel Harvey Biosecurity Group, Peel Harvey Catchment Council and Greening Australia. Funding was supplied through the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme.

 

 The Peel Harvey Biosecurity Group wish all applicants luck with their weed control support provided through the grants and look forward to hearing more success stories in the future. 

 

Support for Weed Control Grant Funding Flyer

Need help to control weeds on your property?

Grants are now available to support the efforts of agricultural landholders and land managers in controlling weeds in the Peel-Harvey Region.

 

Support for weed control-

Expression of Interest

Agricultural landholders and land managers in the local government areas of Waroona, Harvey, Murray, Serpentine-Jarrahdale and Mandurah are invited to apply for grants to support their efforts to control weeds.

Grants of $100 to $1500 are available for the purchase of herbicide, spray packs or the hiring of an appropriate weed control contractor.

Please email exec.officer.phbg@gmail.com to receive an application kit.

 

Support for Weed Control Grant Funding Flyer

The difference between branched (many stemmed ) and common (one main stem) broomrape weed.

Keep your eye out for branched broomrape, in WA.

Due to this year’s interesting weather patterns many people have reported a spike in the amount of broomrape in paddocks and nature reserves. What you may not know is that there are different types of this weed with vastly different consequences for agricultural productivity and export markets.

Branched broomrape is currently targeted under DAFWA’s weed surveillance project due to its potential to adversely impact the agricultural industry. The branched version could easily be confused with common broomrape but to date, it has only been found in South Australia in the Murray Bridge area.

Common broomrape-

Common Broomrape is a brown sticky cylindrical plant that parasitises crops and broad-leaf weeds.

Common broomrape (Orobanche minor) a plant lacking in chlorophyll that relies on other plants for nutrients.

Common broomrape is a parasitic plant which has no chlorophyll and relies on its host for nutrients. The lack of chlorophyll is why the plant is brown. It has a translucent pinky brown stem which is sticky to touch. It is common among capeweed and other broad leaf weeds on roadsides and in agricultural areas. If you have the common variety, dig out the plant making sure you get the bulb-like base of the plant before it can set seed. Bag the plants and dispose in the rubbish bin. Quick disposal after pulling is advised as those left heaped on the ground can still go to seed.

Branched broomrape-

The difference between branched (many stemmed) broomrape and common (one main stem) broomrape.

The difference between branched and common broomrape.

The stem of branched broomrape is erect, thin and richly branched. These branches terminate in flowering spikes. Brown or straw-coloured, it grows 10-30cm high.

Impacts of branched broomrape-

Branched broomrape can be parasitic to a wide range of crops and pastures from several plant families, including canola, cabbage, cauliflower, celery, pulse crops, pasture legumes, cucurbits, hemp, lettuce, sunflower, linseed, beans, capsicums, eggplant, potatoes, tomatoes and onions. Annoyingly this weed will be parasitic to a range of weeds, enabling it to reproduce even when crops are not present.

The weed’s presence could result in partial or total crop losses and the possible loss of potential to produce some crops in heavily affected areas. Branched broomrape can also cause the loss of export markets interstate and overseas, and increases in management and control costs.

Prevention of branched broomrape-

Branched broomrape a many stemmed parasitic brown weed.

Branched broomrape causes huge impacts in agricultural areas.

  • Practice good biosecurity and avoid bringing any contaminated seed, machinery or livestock onto your property.
  • Be vigilant and learn to identify the weeds on and around your property. Report unfamiliar weeds using the MyWeedWatcher on-line reporting tool or the app (see agric.wa.gov.au/myweedwatcher) or contact the Pest and Disease Information Service on freecall 1800 084 881 or info@agric.wa.gov.au.

For more information about branched broomrape identification, search our website: agric.wa.gov.au.  If you think you have branched broomrape or find any other parasitic plant attacking crop or pasture species, please do not attempt to control it, report it as soon as possible.

 

fox and 1080 pest ejector

A New Method of Canid Pest Control

A new method of deploying 1080 for foxes and wild dogs is now available in WA.

The Canid Pest Ejectors (CPEs) are spring-activated baiting devices, with better target specificity and long-term use than conventional baits.

The MedFly

Fruit fly underdone in homemade recipes-

Fruit fly is a major agricultural pest in Western Australia. Mediterranean fruit fly more commonly known as the Med Fly is a major problem for commercial orchardists and landholders.

Fruit fly attacks a large range of fruits, vegetables and nuts. Historically, fruit fly was,  controlled with the use of a pesticide called Fenthion- this was controversially banned in 2015. Fenthion was used to reduce the effect of the Med Fly on WA growers while also providing a tool to prevent the insurgence of the Queesland Fruit Fly (also given a nickname, QFly).

The Qfly lands in Perth-

In late 2015, five Perth Suburbs were quarantined after eight QFly males were caught in surveillance traps. Costing the Department of Agriculture and Food hundreds of thousands of dollars the five affected suburbs were restricted in the movement of fresh fruits and vegetables until the all clear was given. Now Tasmania and South Australia are the only states to have the clear QFly status and the implications for trade with WA is still unknown.

This large output of energy and resources goes to show the seriousness of even a small outbreak of eight flies can be and the effort DAFWA puts into biosecurity to prevent the spread of pests.

Now that Fenthion has been banned in the control of fruit fly there are many different homemade recipes available to help landowners monitor and control fruit fly in their area.

Homemade traps for fruit fly control-

The simple traps below can be made with ingredients and equipment found easily in the home, check out everydayroots.com for more traps ideas.

Don’t forget to use the Pest App from DAFWA to ID any bugs caught!

 

 The Apple Cider Trap- Fruit flies can’t resist the smell of fermentation, and since apple cider vinegar is from fermented apples, it’s a dream drink to them. Heat the vinegar beforehand to release more of its irresistible fragrance.

fruit fly trap made from a paper funnel, jar and apple cider vinegar

This apple cider vinegar trap lure fruit flies in.

 

Equipment-

A mason jar or something similar, a funnel (you can make one yourself), ½ cup of apple cider vinegar, a drop of dish washing soap, and a piece of ripe or overripe fruit (optional).

Heat up the apple cider vinegar and pour into your jar. Add a few drops of dishwashing soap to break up the surface of the liquid and prevent the flies from sitting on the surface. Roll up a piece of paper to make a funnel and place it in the top of the jar, the flies will follow the funnel down but won’t be able to find their way out and will drown. If you find the flies aren’t drowning you can place the whole trap in the freezer for 15-30 minutes until the flies have died.  You can either replicate the trap or continue to use the same one.

 

The Jar Type Trap- Use the fruit flies weakness to lure then in – fermenting fruit

fruit fly trap made from ripe fruit in a jar with plastic wrap with hols poked in.

Everyday kitchen items make a handy fruit fly trap.

Equipment- A glass jar, plastic wrap, a toothpick, some very ripe or overripe produce, and some soapy water.

Put your rotting and/or very ripe fruit in the bottom of a jar. Cover the top of the jar with plastic wrap, secure with a rubber band, and poke holes in the plastic using a toothpick. Put the traps in places fruit flies are congregating and when the trap is full you can submerge in hot soapy water or place in the freezer.

Community responsibility in fruit fly control-

With the new restrictions on pesticides, growers are now at the mercy of good husbandry from landowners in the control of fruit fly. To help reduce fruit fly residents can remove ripening fruit and pick up fallen fruit around trees.

Don’t forget burying ripening fruit does not control fruit fly as the larvae can still emerge from the soil.

For more species or control information on the fruit fly visit the Department of Food and Agriculture website here.

Pantry Blitz- Do you know what bugs you’re living with?

You are invited to take part in an exciting new citizen science activity to uncover the secret lives of the pests living inside your pantry cupboard. Register now for the Pantry Blitz!

Citizen Science- the collection and analysis of data relating to the natural world by members of the general public, typically as part of a collaborative project with professional scientists.

Participants will place a pest trap inside their pantry cupboard for one month and use the free reporting tool MyPestGuide to submit pest reports for identification. Participants must register to receive a free pest trap in the mail. Traps are placed inside the kitchen pantry then once a week for a month you send in your observations. This is a great activity for the kids (as well as adults) to learn about biosecurity and bugs! Recommended you register early for this fun activity as pest trap numbers are limited.

The data you collect will be used to keep Western Australia free from harmful exotic pests. Your reports can make a difference! When making a report you are in fact also helping to protect your local food producers, the people who manufacturer your food products and those employed to deliver and supply you with good quality foods.  So, partner up with the Department of Agriculture and Food, WA to help protect our food, environment and livelihoods from damaging pests by observing what’s in your household pantry and reporting what you see.

What sort of bugs are you looking for?

Pantry Blitz- Do you know what bugs you're living with?

Pantry Blitz – Watch out for the sweet potato weevil!

Of all the sweet potatoe pests this one is the worst!

The sweet potato weevil Cylas formicarius (Fabricius) causes damage in the field, in storage, and is of quarantine significance. It’s a pretty cool looking bug but can cause up to 97% damage where sweet potatoe is cultivated. Sometimes the first indication they are there is cutting open a sweet potatoe and finding tunnels and larvae. Recently a vigilant member of the community discovered this exotic pest after purchasing a bag of sweet potatoe from a local super market. The weevil was reported to the Department of Agriculture and Food via its biosecurity surveillance tool, MyPestGuide Reporter app (for the full story click here).

Pantry Blitz- Do you know what bugs you're living with?

Pantry Blitz – Keep a look out for the elephant weevil!

Watch the wine!

This cool looking bug  is commonly known as the elephant weevil, Orthorhinus cylindrirostris. In Australia they are considered a major pest to wine companies as it feeds on grape vines. It is a brown grey weevil with a long slender snout and long forelegs. When not at the winery the elephant weevil adults and larvae feed on eucalypts and a variety of other plants.

Register now!

You can make observations and send reports anytime using the ‘MyPestGuide” Reporter mobile app or via the online reporting webpage. Your reports will be received automatically by the MyPestGuide Team. Department of Agriculture and Food department experts will then identify the pests reported from your pantry, respond to each report and publish the community’s findings on the Pantry Blitz webpage. So don’t forget to keep checking to see your bugs on the webpage.

Rabbits: a costly pest

 Did you know that rabbits are Australian agriculture’s most costly pest animal? Annual costs exceed $200 million!

Pioneer Thomas Austin freed about a dozen rabbits on his property near Geelong, Victoria, in 1859 and by 1910 feral rabbits had covered  most of their present range. This spread was despite control efforts such as the Western Australian Government’s 1700 kilometer rabbit-proof fence, built between 1901 and 1907.

Were you aware that Australian native vegetation is very sensitive to rabbit damage? As few as 0.5 rabbits per hectare can remove all seedlings of the more palatable native trees and shrubs!

Rabbits have been attributed to the extinction of several small  ground-dwelling mammals in Australia’s arid lands and have contributed to the decline of many native plants and animals.

National Rabbit Roadshow

Attendees at the National Rabbit Roadshow

Attendees at the National Rabbit Roadshow hosted by the Peel Harvey Biosecurity Group.

People attending the National Rabbit Roadshow were highly impressed by the evidence presented by the Invasive Animals Cooperative Research Centre and Victoria’s Department of Environment and Primary Industries. It was shown that methods for removing rabbits are generally well researched.

Poisoning, warren ripping and fumigation (when used in combination, rather than as a single treatment) can effectively control, and can even eradicate, the animal. This is particularly so when the methods are used at the right time of year to maximise their effectiveness.

Local landholder and Peel-Harvey Biosecurity Group vice chair, Marion Lofthouse, left the event with a new perspective on rabbit control.

“I didn’t realise that an initial up-front investment in rabbit control, using a combination of methods, could provide a sustained effect over many, many years,” Mrs Lofthouse said. ‘Doing the job properly in the first place makes rabbit control a cost-effective farm practice in the longer term.”

Rabbits and their control

The rabbit- a declared pest.

The rabbit- a declared pest.

Are you interested in controlling rabbits on your own property? Perhaps you would prefer getting a group of landholders together for landscape-scale control?

Either way, get in touch with the Peel-Harvey Biosecurity Group at info@peelharveybiosecurity.info. We can provide you with updates in this space, including the rollout of the bio-control agent, RHDV1 K5 across Australia.

 

Click here for more information.

cat caught on night camera

Tiddles… is this your cat?

Tiddles...is this your cat?

Photo at trap site captures cat after dark.

The latest round of feral animal control coordinated by Landcare SJ concentrated on the trapping of feral cats and foxes in semi-urban areas. Unfortunately, what was caught time and time again were pet cats roaming free at night time.

New cat laws

To be compliant with the new cat laws, all cat owners must ensure their cat is;

  • Microchipped
  • Sterilised
  • Registered with the local council.

This encourages responsible cat ownership by;

  • Reducing the number of unwanted cats being bred
  • Allowing for cats found in a public place, or on private property to be seized
  • Assisting with reuniting of lost cats with their owners.

The Peel Harvey Biosecurity Group supports individual landowners in the control of feral animals. This control includes the use of traps to capture foxes, cats, and rabbits. If a domestic cat is caught in a trap on private property it could be mistaken for a feral animal and disposed of, or alternatively can be handed over to the local government ranger to find the owner. The ranger will be able to track down the cat’s owners through its microchip (required by law). If the cat does not have a microchip the owners can be fined.

Cats impact on our native species, via direct predation, as well as spreading parasites and viruses. Feral cats are the same species as domestic cats (Felis catus) and have been identified in a CSIRO study as the primary cause of recent Australian mammal extinctions. [pullquote align=”left” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]A conservative estimate puts the total population of feral cats at approximately 4 million. This means feral cats are killing millions of native animals per day.[/pullquote]

Local, state and federal governments as well as conservation and Landcare organisations spend countless hours revegetating and re-establishing native wildlife into bushland. If you own a cat be responsible and keep it indoors, especially at night.

If you would like more information on the trapping of feral pests on your property you can contact the Peel Harvey Biosecurity Group at info@peelharveybiosecurity.info .Further information on your local cat regulations in your area can be found on your local government website.

 

 

cat and possum

Feral cats are an important pest management issue.

 

What is a pest?

The definition of a pest is a destructive insect or other animal that attacks crops, food, livestock, etc.

Animal pests, both vertebrates (backbone) and invertebrates (no backbone), can have an adverse impact on agriculture, the natural environment and even our lifestyle. Animal pests may be exotic animals which are introduced, either accidentally or deliberately. Native animals may also be pests in certain situations.