consultation dates list

Biosecurity Group Opens Proposed Pest Rate Consultation in Mundijong

There was some great conversations between landowners and Peel Harvey Biosecurity Group (PHBG) at the first public consultation for the proposed declared pest rate.

 

Pest Rate Consultation events list

 

A few larger landholders were concerned that landholders would be charged at a proportion of the unimproved value of their land (i.e. ad valorem). They were relieved to find out the charge would be a flat rate, and it would be fixed (i.e. not vary according to property size).

 

 

The Peel Harvey Biosecurity Group believe in a community wide approach to pest management and believe that a small flat/fixed rate for properties one hectare and above is fair. Controlling declared pests sustains the economic, environmental and amenity values of an area, protecting the reasons landholders chose to live there in the first place.

 

Landholders were encouraging towards education and engagement of the community. Many landholders who are committed to controlling pest animals and plants find trouble arises through shared property boundaries with absentee landholders and new lifestyle block owners. Many times a positive heads up with some help to find resources and to know where to start is all that is needed. The PHBG is committed to providing resources, support, and educational events to help landholders in the region learn about effective control options that are available.

 

 

The Peel Harvey region is large and covers many different land uses. This means pest priorities can change across the landscape.  While someone in Harvey may be focused on cotton bush, a resident in Serpentine may be most concerned about foxes. As a community based group with committee members from each Local Government Area the PHBG understands the complexities of declared pest management across the region. The PHBG is happy to discuss with landowners how the proposed pest rate can benefit them, as well as their community.

 

While it may be frustrating to think of the proposed declared pest rate as another ‘tax’ a landholder has to pay, realistically there is no secured, ongoing funding for the control of established declared pests. The big positive is for every dollar that a landholder contributes, the State Government will match it. All funds will be used specifically in the Peel Harvey region on declared pests, according to an operational budget that is approved annually.

 

The Peel Harvey Biosecurity Group has more consultation events planned across the Peel Harvey region – you can look on the PHBG website or Facebook page for more information. Alternatively you can email questions to comms.phbg@gmail.com.

Fox pelts, echidnas and photoboards delight showgoers at biosecurity stall.

The Peel Harvey Biosecurity Group (PHBG) continued their annual traditional of hosting a stall at the 2017 Waroona Show.

Showcasing weed and pest management information, some fantastic props, registration forms for upcoming rabbit workshops, and photo boards the stall had a constant stream of visitors throughout the day.

By far the most popular activity at the stall was the WANTED Feral Animal photoboards. Kids just couldn’t go past the opportunity to pose as a wanted animal with character names such as Charlie ‘the chicken snatcher’ Canid and Ruby ‘the ankle twister’ Rabbit. Children, as well as some young at heart adults, posed with the photo boards whilst family members took pictures and were encouraged to share the pictures far and wide on social media.

 

Kids pose with feral animal photoboards

 

The photoboards while being fun are also informative and include information on the negative affects of the pests in the shape of ‘crimes’ and subsequent control options available to landowners.  They also help to share how community members can report sightings of pests using the MyPestGuide reporting system via an app or online form.

Another popular part of the stall was the stuffed native animals- Carnaby Black Cockatoo, Echidna and Quoll.  Many children had never seen these animals close up and were able to touch and feel the animals. There was also a fox pelt for people to touch and feel which generated a lot of interest. These resources were great conversation starters around what landowners had seen on their property or in local reserves.

 

Stuffed Echidna and Quoll with fox pelt at the PHBG Biosecurity stall.

 

The rabbit photoboard was one of the most popular for kids and rabbits were a hot topic from community members as well.  The stall was also an opportunity for landowners to sign up for the upcoming Rabbit Control Workshop . This workshop will coincide with the next release of the RHDV1 K5 or calicivirus.

PHBG officers are accredited to mix and disperse the virus and are seeking expressions of interest for landowners that would like to be involved in the November release. Signing up as a rabbit hotspot will involve monitoring before and after at the release site.

If you would like to register your interest email comms.phbg@gmail.com

Community members can also help by reporting rabbit, or other pests, via the MyPestGuide reporting system via an app or online form.

My Pest Guide logo

Pig trapping workshop

Have you seen signs of feral pigs on your property? Have you seen disturbance and thought it was pigs but weren’t sure? Do you want to learn the most effective trapping techniques for feral pigs? Then come along to the Pest Fest with two feral pig trapping workshop to choose from and many more activities on show.

A family of feral pigs

 

Feral pigs are a serious environmental and agricultural pest across Australia. They are found in all states and territories, particularly around wetlands and river systems.

They prey on native animals and plants, dig up large expanses of soil and vegetation in search of food and foul fresh water. Feral pigs will eat many things including small mammals, birds, reptiles, frogs, crayfish, eggs, earthworms and other invertebrates, and all parts of plants including the fruit, seeds, roots, tubers, bulbs and foliage.

Feral pigs can host animal diseases that can be transmitted to other species. In dirt on their feet and fur, they can also spread plant pathogens such as Phytophthora cinnamomi, which causes plant dieback. Feral pigs move around to new sites with food and water, and can breed rapidly to recover from control programs or droughts, and the impacts of feral pigs are intensified when their populations are large.

 

A feral pig walking through undergrowth

 

 

 

 

Attendees at the workshop will learn all aspects of pig trapping from experienced officers including:
-Practical knowledge of the effective and ethical management of feral pigs.
-Impact of pigs on the agriculture and natural environments.
-Learn how to trap,1080 baiting options,
-Recognise pig activity through scats and rutting.
-Impacts of pigs as vectors of disease and pathogens.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Workshop Details:

Times -12.00pm and 1.00pm 

Venue-Waroona Landcare Centre

Registrations essential, email comms.phbg@gmail.com